Protests in the United States have become an incredible manifestation of the power of democracy and undermined Trump's rating. Leftists should take this chance.




What is happening in the United States from the outside may seem strange. The most powerful country in the world (in addition, one of the richest and most technologically advanced) has not only been completely unable to deal effectively with the pandemic, but also is bursting at the seams in attacks of protests and civil disagreements. Russian President Vladimir Putin expressed a widespread view that the United States is in a “deep domestic crisis”. As others have noted, this crisis echoes the fact that it swept the Soviet empire on the path to collapse.

The states are in a critical situation, and the most obvious manifestation of it is the protests - perhaps the largest in American history. But it would not be entirely fair to say that these protests reflect or exacerbate the “deep domestic crisis,” as Putin and others believe (and perhaps hope). No less likely that they will be able to strengthen American democracy.

Moreover, they can help the left win victories, unthinkable a few weeks ago. Will we recall this time as at the time of the US transition from the path of democratic decline and discord to the path of positive, progressive change? This will depend on various factors, and not least on the decisions that the left will take.

Protest is a legal form of using political rights in democratic countries; the way in which citizens can express their point of view outside the electoral process. Protests really often arise because of dissatisfaction with this process, namely, the decisions and behavior of elected officials. Thus, large-scale mobilization and even discontent are not always a problem for democratic regimes. By providing citizens with a variety of legal ways to express their demands, democratic ones acquire peaceful ways of self-regulation, which are absent in dictatorships.

The amazing manifestation of democracy
The protests that erupted in the United States are really caused by the fact that people are unhappy with the behavior of government officials, elected and more. The impetus was the reaction to the murder of George Floyd in Minnesota at the end of May by a police officer who was later charged with murder. But soon the protests grew into demands to eliminate the systemic inequalities and injustices that made the assassination of George Floyd possible. Demonstrations took place in every state, in cities and towns, and people of various backgrounds, with different religious views and socio-economic status took part in them. The protests were an amazing manifestation of not only anger and discontent, but also the potential strength of democratic participation.

Within several weeks they have already achieved serious results. The most obvious is their influence on public opinion. Unlike previous cases where police killed African-American citizens, the murder of George Floyd is not justified and is not looking for an explanation. Eighty-eight percent of white Americans believe that the protests that followed him were justified. CNN's director of politics barely believed this, noting that so many people usually “disagree on any issue.”

The views on the Black Lives Matter movement, which is most associated with protests, are also changing rapidly. Before, many white Americans criticized him or were wary of him, and in the past few weeks, support for Black Lives Matter has increased almost as much as in the previous two years.

Deep problems
But not only did Floyd's assassination change, police brutality and the BLM movement change. More and more citizens have recognized and begun to tackle the deeper problems of racism and inequality. For example, now six out of ten white Americans call racism a “big problem” in society, and more than two-thirds believe that Floyd’s murder reflects more widespread problems in US law enforcement.

In response to this shift in public awareness, even very conservative publications such as the National Review and The American Conservative have recently begun to publish articles with titles such as “Seven Reasons Why Police Cruelty is a Systemic and Not an Accidental Problem” and “America Begins to see more clearly what black citizens have always known. ” One observer in the United States noted that "if we talk about such radical, almost simultaneous changes, it seems to me that we have not seen anything like it before."

And not only public opinion is changing. Companies, sports clubs, entertainment venues and other institutions that had previously avoided racial justice also joined the movement.

The National League of American Football, albeit belatedly, nevertheless admitted that Colin Kapernik and other athletes had the right to protest against police brutality, standing on

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