China is Showing its True and Ugly Colors Again

China is showing its true and ugly colors again

But it took a clearly more confrontational metamorphose when Weijia Jiang, a White House correspondent for CBS News, asked the president why he repeatedly (and inaccurately) claimed that the U.S. was "far better than any other country in the world" when it came to testing.

China is showing its true — and ugly — colors again

Today, The Intercept and The Intercept Brasil are publishing two internal TikTok moderation documents, recreated with only less redactions, below. One stratum out bandy for ideologically undesirable capacity in livestreams, and another describes algorithmic punishments for unattractive and impoverished users. The documents appear to have been originally drink in Chinese and inferior — at times awkwardly — translated into English for use in TikTok's global offices. TikTok is owned by ByteDance, a Beijing-headquartered company that operates a suite of popular sites and friendly apps, a sort of Chinese analog to Facebook. ByteDance, founded in 2012, has come under survey by the U.S. government over its ligature to the Chinese Communist Party and melodious reports that the app's censorship tactics fashioned those of Beijing; Sens. Chuck Schumer and Josh Hawley have both worked to limit TikTok's application by government personnel, arguing that it presents a risk to national security. TikTok spokesperson Josh Gartner told The Intercept that "most of" the livestream guideline reviewed by The Intercept "are either no longer in use, or in some cases appear to never have been in place," but would not foresee specifics. Regarding the policy of suppressing videos shape unattractive, disabled, or mean users, Gartner stated that the rules "represented an soon blunt attempt at deter bullying, but are no longer in place, and were already out of use when The Intercept obtained them." Sources registered that both sets of policies were in use through at least late 2019 and that the livestream policy document was created in 2019. Gartner would not explain why a document purportedly aimed at "deter bullying" would constrain zero mention of bullying, nor why it offers an explicit justification of attracting users, not preserve them. Excluding Undesirable Users From the "For You" Fire Hose One moderation document delineation corporeal features, bodily and environmental, deemed too unattractive spells out a litany of flaws that could be grounds for invisibly blackball a stated clip from the "For You" section of the app, where TikTok videos are funneled to a immense audience supported on secret criteria. Although what it takes to earn a spot on the "For You" slice relics a mystery, the document disclose that it took very little to be expel, all based on the disputation that uploads by unattractive, poor, or otherwise undesirable users could "cut the short-term new user retention rate," as stated in the document. This is of particular moment, the document stresses, for videos in which the user "is basically the only focus of the video … if the character's appearance or the shooting environment is not good, the video will be much less attractive, not worthing to be recommended to new users."

China is showing its true — and ugly — ensign again Top Stories H.BUSH January 2, 2021 Showing its faithful colors again this week, the Chinese Communist Party sentenced its first citizen journalist to trying time — for reporting the truth about the COVID-19 burst in Wuhan. Zhang Zhan, a former lawyer who traveled to Wuhan in February, was sentenced to four for ever in prison after being found criminal of "nice quarrels and provoking trouble" with her reporting. It's a patently ridiculous and vague — but typical — load manner by the Communist Party to silence critics. Zhang was merely reporting what she saw, sharing videos of full hospitals and people worrying about their incomes. But she was also critical of the government, which is a invitation for trouble. "The government's way of managing this city has equitable been intimidation and threats," Zhang reported. "This is truly the tragedy of this country." Chen Jiangang, a Chinese human-rights lawyer who fled to America last year, said Zhang's sentence is proof the CCP suppose that to hold onto power, it must cling to its false coronavirus narrative. "Any time the Chinese Communist Party thinks of a case as political, what they utility is repression. Extremely cruel destruction," he said. "What was Zhang Zhan's crime? She exact went to Wuhan, saw some things, talked touching them. That's it." Zhang, who has been in imprisonment since May, is on a hunger strike, and her health is declining. Her defiance might end up costing Zhang her life. Meanwhile, China has also put 12 fugitives on trial for attempting to flee the mainland, prompting outrage from the US embassy there, which summon their immediate let go: "Communist China will impede at nothing to frustrate its people from seeking unreservedness elsewhere," an embassy statement before-mentioned. Let's just hope Joe Biden is taking note. Source link H.BUSH View all posts Leave a Reply Cancel replyYour email woo will not be published. Required fields are marked *Comment Name * Email * Website Save my name, email, and website in this browser for the next time I comment.

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Many TikTok behavior breakers will probable never receive a atone explanation for their punishment, because the existence and contents of the fine-grained rules have been kept out of public scene. TikTok retain its users accountable to secret policies that, as on other digital platforms, attempt to suggest what is impermissible and how offending users are to be punished.

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Trump, looking visibly angry, responded, "Maybe that's a question you should ask China," Trump told Jiang. "Don't ask me. Ask China that question, okay?"

The content moderation documents hold by The Intercept Brasil and The Intercept contain indications that standards compelled on TikTok livestreams start in China. One document, while in English, include clunky phrasing suggestive of machine translation, as well as references to a Chinese language font embedded in the file itself, while the help contains large portions of both Chinese and English SMS. The TikTok livestream policy guide details 64 possible infractions organized into 13 distinct categories, each corresponding to a specific penalty. The categories range from the obvious common-sense prohibitions ("Juvenile Improper Behavior") to the prim and baffling: TikTok users who "Give the digit on purpose over twice" will have their stream terminated and their account banned for a day, while "disrupting general unity," left undefined, comes with a permanent suspension.

"Any season the Chinese language Communist Occasion thinks of a case as political, what they use is suppression. Extraordinarily merciless suppression," he specify. "What was Zhang Zhan's iniquity? She simply went to Wuhan, noticed some issues, talked about them. That's it."

Lemos, who had been in the city for three months, hunkering down at home to retire descent ill or infecting others, had hoped for some solidarity. "I was in the trenches with them, so to declare," he aforesaid.

Trump also claimed that if not for WHO, "the revolt could have been contained at its spring with very narrow death." He bewailed that the U.S. can't rely on WHO for "accurate, timely and uncontrolled information to make important public health recommendations and decisions."

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"It is chastise that for live streaming TikTok is particularly vigilant about keeping sexualized content off the platform," Gartner wrote in an email. The extent moderation documents obtained by The Intercept Brasil and The Intercept contain indications that standards enforced on TikTok livestreams originate in China. One document, while in English, contains clunky phrasing suggestive of machine tralation, as well as references to a Chinese language spring embedded in the file itself, while the another contains large portions of both Chinese and English text. The TikTok livestream policy guide details 64 possible infractions organized into 13 different categories, each corresponding to a precise forfeiture. The categories row from the obvious common-sense prohibitions ("Juvenile Improper Behavior") to the prudish and baffling: TikTok users who "Give the play on purpose over twice" will have their stream terminated and their reckoning banned for a age, while "breach national unity," left undefined, comes with a permanent stop. TikTok's politic rules have proven controversial in the recall ended. In September, the Guardian reported on similar content moderation documents that evince how TikTok "prepare its moderators to censor videos that mention Tiananmen Square, Tibetan independence, or the banned religious group Falun Gong," among other authoritarian-friendly censorship rules. ByteDance, eliding this confirmation of TikTok's use to push Chinese foreign policy, recognized to the Guardian that "In TikTok's early days we took a blunt advances to diminish conflict on the platform, and our temperateness guideline allowed penalties to be given for things like content that promoted conflict, such as between religious sects or ethnic groups, spanning a number of regions around the Earth. … The old guidelines in question are outdated and no longer in use."

At around the same time, on Jan. 22, Trump was asked peculiarity-shot whether he worried about coronavirus's spread, and he answered: "No, not at all," insisting it was honest "one impersonate coming from China" and that "we have it entirely under check."

Indeed, that settlement to this Time still continues to delude him into credulous he govern this misadventure effectively. That's why he keeps citing it as rep of his glorious, decisive heady — and contrasting it favorably with the WHO's response.


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