China True and Ugly Colors Again 2021

China  True and Ugly Colors Again 2021

Trump, looking visibly angry, responded, "Maybe that's a question you should request China," Trump told Jiang. "Don't ask me. Ask China that question, okay?"

"Any time the Chinese Communist Party suppose of a suit as politic, what they use is suppression. Extremely cruel omission," he said. "What was Zhang Zhan's robbery? She upright went to Wuhan, saw some things, communication about them. That's it."

Over the past few weeks, as Chinese health officials reported untried "imported" coronavirus cases almost every day, foreigners living in the country have noticed a change. They have been turned away from restaurants, shops, gyms and hotels, subjected to further screening, shout at by provincial and avoided in public roam.

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On TikTok, livestreamed military movements and natural disasters, video that "defamed civilized servants," and other important that might lower "national security" has been suppressed alongside videos showing rural poverty, slums, beer bellies, and crooked smiles. One handwriting goes so far as to instruct moderators to scan uploads for cracked walls and "disreputable decorations" in users' own homes — then to effectively punish these poorer TikTok users by artificially narrowing their audiences.

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The reaction, at least among Democrats, was swift and harshly captious. Bernie Sanders tweeted a video of the exchange between the guardian and Jiang, animadvert, "Pretty pathetic. Mr. Trump is a coward who tears down others to make himself feel powerful." And David Axelrod, a former Obama official and now a commentator on CNN, tweeted, "What a finish. He dismisses a debate from @weijia, a Chinese-American reporter, about why he boasts throughout our cupellation versus others by telling her to ask China. And when @kaitlancollins of @CNN approached the mic to ask her interrogation, the @POTUS fled."

The cully-up with Jiang and Collins without a doubt followed a copy ever since the presiding has been holding regular, sometimes daily, coronavirus briefings at the White House. A few weeks ago, he bristled at a subject asked by Yamiche Alcindor, the PBS Newshour White House correspondent, telling her, "Be silly, don't be threatening," before a White House aide came over and took the mic out of her hands. More recently, he called the CBS reporter Paula Reid "unbecoming" and "a fake" when she challenged him on why he didn't do more to act on coronavirus in the months of January and February, before it began to spread widely around the U.S.

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Today, The Intercept and The Intercept Brasil are publishing two real TikTok moderation documents, recreated with only minor redactions, below. One lays out bans for ideologically undesirable content in livestreams, and another describes algorithmic punishments for unattractive and ruin users. The documents appear to have been originally drafted in Chinese and later — at times awkwardly — translated into English for use in TikTok's global offices. TikTok is owned by ByteDance, a Beijing-headquartered company that operates a suite of popular sites and friendly apps, a pair of Chinese analog to Facebook. ByteDance, based in 2012, has come under scrutiny by the U.S. government over its bond to the Chinese Communist Party and melodious reports that the app's censorship tactics mirror those of Beijing; Sens. Chuck Schumer and Josh Hawley have both worked to limit TikTok's use by government personnel, arguing that it presents a risk to national security.

Fantasy owners failed to net this early on and drafted these players as if they had been flourish in the NFL for years. Edwards-Helaire was a first-rounder while Taylor and Akers went as high as the third. When evaluating rookie running backs next year, spend less time focus on what they looked like in college and more on what will be asked of them at this level. If they don't prepare the right way, they won't be much good to you until it's too late.

Many TikTok rule breakers will likely never receive a satiate explanation for their punishment, along the existence and contents of the excellent-ingrained rules have been kept out of public view. TikTok holds its users accountable to secret policies that, as on other digital platforms, attempt to dictate what is impermissible and how offending users are to be punished.

However, the TiKTok documents reviewed by The Intercept include a rank of policies beyond those reported by Netzpolitik, involving among other stuff the suppression of content from poor, old, and "ugly" users. Furthermore, these documents contain no mention of any anti-bullying rationalization, instead explicitly citing an entirely different justification: The need to retain new users and grow the app.

First, at least 40,000 people traveled to the U.S. from China after this announcement, raising reasonable questions about how much it actually accomplished. More importantly, Trump disastrously squandered the time bought by this decision.

At around the same time, on Jan. 22, Trump was beg peculiarity-blank whether he worried about coronavirus's spread, and he face: "No, not at all," insisting it was true "one person coming from China" and that "we have it totally under control."

The content chasteness documents obtained by The Intercept Brasil and The Intercept contain indications that standards enforced on TikTok livestreams begin in China. One document, while in English, contains clunky phrasing suggestive of bicycle translation, as well as regard to a Chinese language font embedded in the file itself, while the second contains ample portions of both Chinese and English text. The TikTok livestream policy regulator details 64 possible infractions organized into 13 different categories, each conformable to a specific penalty. The categories rove from the opposing frequent-sense prohibitions ("Juvenile Improper Behavior") to the prim and baffling: TikTok users who "Give the pilfer on intend over twice" will have their stream terminated and their rehearsal banned for a day, while "disrupting national unity," left undefined, comes with a durable suspension.

Jiang, Reid, Collins, and Alcindor, along with Kristin Fisher of Fox News and Francesca Chambers of McClatchy, were recently honest out by CNN's Brian Stelter, the army of Reliable Sources, as a "new generation of correspondents not agitation President Trump's not-my-fault routine for an answer." Said Stelter, "They're urgent, following up and fact-checking in real time." Adding, "They're showing that youth can be an asset—along with persistence."And the fact that they are all women seems to be something that Trump finds particularly maddening, as Olivia Nuzzi, the Washington correspondent for New York magazine, tweeted yesterday: "The President's unprofessionalism is always revealed most clearly when he is interacting with female reporters."Two weeks ago, at another White House briefing, Nuzzi asked the heady, "If an American president loses more Americans over the course of six weeks than grain in the entirety of the Vietnam War, does he deserve to be reelected?" Nuzzi asked.For a little over a minute, Trump danced around the investigation, refusing to answer it directly, and then, as he did Monday, abruptly ended the briefing and walked quickly back into the safe refuge of his home.

Today, The Intercept and The Intercept Brasil are publishing two interior TikTok moderation documents, recreated with only lesser redactions, below. One lays out bans for ideologically undesirable content in livestreams, and another describes algorithmic punishments for unattractive and impoverished users. The handwriting appear to have been originally drafted in Chinese and later — at times awkwardly — entrance into English for use in TikTok's global offices. TikTok is owned by ByteDance, a Beijing-headquartered company that operates a suite of common situation and social apps, a condition of Chinese analog to Facebook. ByteDance, based in 2012, has come under scrutiny by the U.S. government over its bond to the Chinese Communist Party and numerous reports that the app's censorship tactics fashioned those of Beijing; Sens. Chuck Schumer and Josh Hawley have both worked to termination TikTok's use by government personnel, arguing that it presents a jeopardy to national security. TikTok spokesman Josh Gartner told The Intercept that "most of" the livestream guidelines reviewed by The Intercept "are either no longer in use, or in some cases appear to never have been in trust," but would not provide specifics. Regarding the cunning of suppressing videos shape unattractive, disabled, or poor users, Gartner stated that the rules "represented an early blunt attempt at help bullying, but are no longer in place, and were already out of use when The Intercept obtained them." Sources indicated that both sets of policies were in usefulness through at least late 2019 and that the livestream wit dogma was created in 2019. Gartner would not explain why a document purportedly aimed at "preventing bullying" would make zero mention of bullying, nor why it offers an unambiguous justification of attracting users, not protecting them. Excluding Undesirable Users From the "For You" Fire Hose One moderation document outlining physical features, bodily and environmental, deemed too unattractive spells out a litany of flaws that could be grounds for invisibly barring a given curtail from the "For You" section of the app, where TikTok videos are infundibulum to a immensity audience based on secret criteria. Although what it takes to obtain a spot on the "For You" section remains a mystery, the document reveals that it took very little to be excluded, all based on the argument that uploads by unattractive, poor, or otherwise undesirable users could "decrease the short-conditions newly user retraint rate," as stated in the document. This is of particular import, the document stresses, for videos in which the user "is basically the only focus of the video … if the character's appearance or the shooting environment is not excellent, the video will be much less attractive, not worthing to be advise to new users."

Yesterday's White House briefing on the coronavirus pandemic, during which President Trump falsely maintain that the number of COVID-19 infections and deaths were declining in the United States and exaggerated the ease with which Americans can get tested for the poison, extermination abruptly and chaotically when Trump was challenged by two female reporters.Yes, female reporters. Again.As has become increasingly evident over the past two months, a newer generation of White House reporters—most of them women, some who are women of color—have been asking forceful, sharp questions that have sparkle unusually flustered, and even contrary, reactions from the president.At yesterday's briefing, some reporters, both male and female, questioned the president's proclaim that widespread testing was now available in the U.S. and wondered aloud about how any workplace could be considered unharmed if coronavirus had infiltrated the White House. (It was recently confirmed that Katie Miller, the straiten clerk to Vice President Mike Pence and the rib of top White House aide Stephen Miller, had tested certain.)But it took a decidedly more confrontational turn when Weijia Jiang, a White House correspondent for CBS News, asked the president why he repeatedly (and inaccurately) claimed that the U.S. was "greatly better than any other country in the world" when it came to testing."Why does that importance?" she asked Trump. "Why is this a global competition to you if, every day, Americans are still cozening their lives and we are still seeing more cases?"Trump, looking visibly angry, responded, "Maybe that's a question you should ask China," Trump told Jiang. "Don't ask me. Ask China that question, okay?"There was a long pause, before Jiang, who came to the U.S. from China when she was two years ancient and who seemed visibly taken aback by Trump's response, pulled her mask partially down so that she could be heard more clearly and said to the president: "Sir, why are you saying that to me specifically?""I'm telling you," Trump replied. "I'm not saying it specifically to anybody. I'm saying it to anybody that asks a disagreeable question.""That's not a foul question," Jiang said. "Why does it affair?"Trump then looked around the Rose Garden, seeking out another reporter to call on, as Jiang's microphone appeared to be pierce off.

Others describe more scrutiny and wariness. American David Alexander, 32, who lives in the southern province of Jiangsu, said his Chinese co-workers had been advised to stay away from foreigners. In a shop last week, a couple waited until he had left before entering. "There is a sense of fear around foreigners," he said.


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