Jim Jordan says he won't run for Senate in 2022

Jim Jordan says he won't run for Senate in 2022


Rep. Jim JordanJames (Jim) Daniel JordanThe Hill's Morning Report - Biden argues for legislative patience, urgent action amid crisis Portman's exit underscores Republican identity crisis Portman planned exit sets off Ohio free-for-all MORE (R-Ohio), who gained national attention as one of former President Trump's most ardent defenders during his first impeachment, said Thursday he will not run for retiring Sen. Rob PortmanRobert (Rob) Jones PortmanOhio lieutenant governor won't run for Portman's Senate seat The Hill's Morning Report - Biden seeks vaccine for all by summer; Trump censure? Former Ohio state health director reportedly considering Senate bid MORE’s (R-Ohio) seat in 2022.

Jordan “is alone targeted on representing the nice individuals of Ohio’s Fourth District, will} not be running to fill the seat of retiring legislator Rob Portman,” a representative for the congressman’s workplace told Cleveland.com.

“Mr. Jordan believes at this point he's higher suited to represent Ohioans within the House of Representatives, wherever because the high Republican on the Judiciary Committee, he can advance an America 1st agenda, promote conservative values, and hold massive government accountable.”

Jordan was one among many potential political party candidates mentioned when Portman proclaimed that he wouldn't seek a third term next year. Four of Jordan’s GOP colleagues — Reps. Mike TurnerMichael Ray TurnerOhio lieutenant governor won't run for Portman's Senate seat Portman planned exit sets off Ohio free-for-all Overnight Defense: Mike Rogers slated to be top House Armed Services Republican | Defense bill hits another snag | Pentagon dinged for 0M loan to trucking company using COVID funds MORE, Steve StiversSteven (Steve) Ernst StiversOhio lieutenant governor won't run for Portman's Senate seat The Hill's Morning Report - Biden argues for legislative patience, urgent action amid crisis Portman planned exit sets off Ohio free-for-all MORE, Brad WenstrupBrad Robert WenstrupOhio lieutenant governor won't run for Portman's Senate seat The Hill's Morning Report - Biden seeks vaccine for all by summer; Trump censure? Overnight Health Care: Biden takes steps to boost number of vaccine doses sent to states | CDC researchers find 'little evidence' of major school outbreaks, with precautions | Eli Lilly says antibody combo significantly cuts COVID-19 death risk MORE and David JoyceDavid JoyceOhio lieutenant governor won't run for Portman's Senate seat The Hill's Morning Report - Biden argues for legislative patience, urgent action amid crisis Portman planned exit sets off Ohio free-for-all MORE — have all expressed interest in potentially seeking the seat.

On the Democratic side, Reps. Tim RyanTimothy (Tim) RyanOhio lieutenant governor won't run for Portman's Senate seat Capitol Police chief apologizes, admits to department's failures in riot The Hill's Morning Report - Biden argues for legislative patience, urgent action amid crisis MORE and Joyce BeattyJoyce Birdson BeattyOhio lieutenant governor won't run for Portman's Senate seat Lawmakers highlight need for financial literacy to improve credit The Hill's Morning Report - Biden argues for legislative patience, urgent action amid crisis MORE have both declined to rule out a run. Beatty would be the state’s first Black senator if elected.

While Portman was considered among the more moderate GOP senators, the state has trended rightward since then-President Obama won it twice. Gov. Mike DeWineMike DeWineFormer Ohio state health director reportedly considering Senate bid Portman planned exit sets off Ohio free-for-all Tim Ryan says he's 'looking seriously' at running for Portman's Senate seat MORE (R) was elected in 2018 and it was one of just a few states that Trump flipped from Obama in 2016 and won a second time in 2020. Sen. Sherrod BrownSherrod Campbell BrownFinancial firms brace for Biden's consumer agency chief Portman planned exit sets off Ohio free-for-all Portman won't run for reelection MORE (D) is currently Ohio’s only Democratic statewide officeholder.

Portman, who was first elected in 2010, cited what he said was intractable partisan gridlock in announcing his retirement, saying, “We live in an increasingly polarized country where members of both parties are being pushed further to the right and further to the left, and that means too few people who are actively looking to find common ground.”

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