Ship believed to be lost in Bermuda Triangle in 1920s, found off St. Augustine's coast

Ship believed to be lost in Bermuda Triangle in 1920s, found off St. Augustine's coast

Rescuers found no exterior signal of trauma to the reptile, although it was hypoglycemic. Staffers with the aquarium's sea turtle rescue program gave it antibiotics, vitamins and some time to deliver at their facilities.

Ship believed to be lost in Bermuda Triangle in 1920s, found off St ...

(CNN) — Marine biologists at the South Carolina Aquarium were entreat a rare, 475-pound leatherback sea turtle that washed up Saturday, March 7, 2015, on a nearby beach. The episode marks the first rescue of a leatherback sea turtle in South Carolina and is believed to be only the ⅕ live recover of this variety in the United States, according to the South Carolina Department of Natural Resources. The endangered turtle was found abandon on the Yawkey-South Island Preserve, a wildlife sanctuary present Georgetown, South Carolina. Rescuers hight it Yawkey. Because the turtle is believed to be a juvenile — rescuers say it's probably less than 10 years antique — and has not reached sexual maturity, biologists can't yet determine its sex. Rescuers found no external signs of trauma to the lacertian, although it was hypoglycemic. Staffers with the aquarium's sea turtle rescue program gave it antibiotics, vitamins and some era to recover at their facilities. The treatments appearance to be helping. Aquarium officials above-mentioned the turtle was more energetic Tuesday than when it was first admitted. Even so, leatherback turtles historically assume't do well in confinement. For that motive, aquarium staffers are operation with the state's Department of Natural Resources to determine the best ground and time to release the turtle back into the ocean — most likely within the next few days. Leatherbacks are the largest turtles on Earth and can grow up to 2,000 pounds. They are found throughout the world's oceans and have been specky as far north as Norway and as far south as South America.

Wreckage of ship tied to Bermuda Triangle found off FloridaEven so, leatherback turtles historically don't do well in captivity. For that reason, aquarium staffers are working with the state's Department of Natural Resources to determine the best place and time to release the turtle back into the ocean — most likely within the next few days.


The ship was lacking important structural components and "unbeknownst to the captain and crew, they were sailing into a tropical storm," Meide said. The hulk set sail on Nov. 29, 1925.

The 250-foot (76-meters) SS Cotopaxi was sailing from Charleston, South Carolina, to Havana when it disappeared along with its 32-hypostasis crew. But a team of underwater explorers and maritime archaeologists have identified the wreckage of the ship about 35 marine miles off the coast of St. Augustine.

By Brandon Griggs (CNN) — Marine biologists at the South Carolina Aquarium were treating a rare, 475-pound leatherback sea turtle that washed up Saturday, March 7, 2015, on a nearby beach. The episode marks the first rescue of a leatherback sea turtle in South Carolina and is believed to be only the fifth live rescue of this species in the United States, according to the South Carolina Department of Natural Resources. The endangered turtle was found stranded on the Yawkey-South Island Preserve, a wildlife refuge near Georgetown, South Carolina. Rescuers denominate it Yawkey. Because the turtle is believed to be a juvenile — rescuers say it's probably less than 10 years old — and has not reached sexual maturity, biologists can't yet determine its sex. Rescuers found no external signs of trauma to the reptilian, although it was hypoglycemic. Staffers with the aquarium's sea turtle rescue plant gave it antibiotics, vitamins and some time to cure at their facilities. The treatments look to be assistance. Aquarium officials said the turtle was more energetic Tuesday than when it was first admitted. Even so, leatherback turtles historically don't do well in captivity. For that reason, aquarium staffers are working with the state's Department of Natural Resources to finish the best place and time to loose the turtle back into the ocean — most likely within the next few days. Leatherbacks are the largest turtles on Earth and can grow up to 2,000 pounds. They are found throughout the world's oceans and have been spotted as far north as Norway and as far south as South America.  

ST. AUGUSTINE, Fla. — Lost in the Bermuda Triangle. That's what people thought happened to one ship that vanished in the 1920s. However, scientists have just determined that the antique ship is actually on the ocean floor just off of St. Augustine. The ship was called the Cotopaxi. It was a 250-foot-long load steamship that sailed from Charleston, South Carolina, heading for Havana in 1925. But on that voyage, it evaporate. It and its whole 32 person crew just disappeared. "The ship became part of the Bermuda Triangle myth," Chuck Meide of the Lighthouse Maritime Archaeological Maritime Program said. It's the place in the Atlantic Ocean where ships and planes just "cut away." The Cotopaxi was also the roller found in the desert in the movie "Close Encounters of the Third Kind." "There's that scene with the old rusting shipper in the desert with Cotopaxi on the hull," Meide said. A federal scientist and diver named Michael Barnette researched the ship, and he suppose the Cotopaxi was really a shipwreck that many First Coast locals refer to as the Bear Wreck. It's located about 35 miles off of St. Augustine. Barnette asked local devil dog archaeologists Meide and Brendan Burke to go to the site with him for a second opinion. Meide said the shipwreck divers took a measuring ferret and measured parts of the ship. And those measurements match up with the vein's blueprint. "We're pretty convinced there is compelling evidence this is the Cotopaxi," Meide told First Coast News. "Mystery solved!" So what happened to the ship in 1925? Meide pret. quoth according to scrutiny, the ship was missing momentous organic components. Also, "unbeknownst to the captain and force, they were sailing into the speech of a tropical clamor," he said. So all this time, the Cotopaxi was famous for its Bermuda Triangle connection and movie stardom when, it turns out, "it's been right off our coast Spear fishermen have been diving off of this clothes for for ever," Meide said. These findings will air in a recent Science Channel thread called Shipwreck Secrets on Feb. 9. Meide will be featured in that episode.

Meide said according to research, the liner was missing important structural components. Also, "unbeknownst to the captain and crew, they were seamanship into the mouth of a tropical storm," he above-mentioned.


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