Ship believed to be lost in Bermuda Triangle in 1920s, St. Augustine's coast

Ship believed to be lost in Bermuda Triangle in 1920s, found off St. Augustine's coast

The 250-foot (76-meters) SS Cotopaxi was sailing from Charleston, South Carolina, to Havana when it vanish along with its 32-person crew. But a team of underwater explorers and marine archaeologists have identified the wreckage of the roller about 35 nautical miles off the coast of St. Augustine.

A ship was believed to have vanished in the Bermuda Triangle ...

Rescuers found no outward signal of trauma to the hydr-, although it was hypoglycemic. Staffers with the aquarium's sea turtle retake program gave it antibiotics, vitamins and some time to recover at their facilities.

Ship believed to be lost in Bermuda Triangle in 1920s, found off St ...

Meide said according to research, the vessel was missing important structural components. Also, "unbeknownst to the captain and crew, they were sailing into the mouth of a tropical storm," he above-mentioned.

A ship was believed to have vanished in the Bermuda Triangle ...

By Brandon Griggs (CNN) — Marine biologists at the South Carolina Aquarium were treating a rare, 475-pound leatherback sea turtle that washed up Saturday, March 7, 2015, on a nearby beach. The episode marks the first rescue of a leatherback sea turtle in South Carolina and is believed to be only the ⅕ feed rescue of this kind in the United States, according to the South Carolina Department of Natural Resources. The endangered turtle was found stranded on the Yawkey-South Island Preserve, a wildlife refuge intimately Georgetown, South Carolina. Rescuers named it Yawkey. Because the turtle is trust to be a juvenile — rescuers say it's perchance less than 10 years old — and has not reached sexual due date, biologists can't yet finish its sex. Rescuers found no external signs of trauma to the reptile, although it was hypoglycemic. Staffers with the aquarium's sea turtle rescue playbill gave it antibiotics, vitamins and some repetition to recover at their facilities. The treatments appear to be helping. Aquarium officials said the turtle was more hearty Tuesday than when it was first acknowledged. Even so, leatherback turtles historically don't do well in captivity. For that reason, aquarium staffers are working with the state's Department of Natural Resources to determine the cream place and tense to discharge the turtle back into the ocean — most handsome within the next few days. Leatherbacks are the greatest turtles on Earth and can wax up to 2,000 pounds. They are found throughout the world's oceans and have been blotchy as far north as Norway and as far south as South America.  

ST. AUGUSTINE, Fla. — Lost in the Bermuda Triangle. That's what folks reflection happened to one ship that vanished in the 1920s. However, scientists have regular determined that the old ship is actually on the ocean floor just off of St. Augustine. The ship was denominate the Cotopaxi. It was a 250-foot-long load steamship that sailed from Charleston, South Carolina, heading for Havana in 1925. But on that sail, it vanished. It and its undivided 32 person crew upright disappeared. "The ship became part of the Bermuda Triangle myth," Chuck Meide of the Lighthouse Maritime Archaeological Maritime Program said. It's the place in the Atlantic Ocean where ships and planes just "slip aside." The Cotopaxi was also the ship found in the desert in the movie "Close Encounters of the Third Kind." "There's that scene with the old corrode freighter in the desert with Cotopaxi on the hull," Meide said. A federal scientist and diver named Michael Barnette researched the ship, and he believed the Cotopaxi was actually a shipwreck that many First Coast locals point to as the Bear Wreck. It's located helter-skelter 35 miles off of St. Augustine. Barnette asked provincial marine archaeologists Meide and Brendan Burke to go to the site with him for a second persuasion. Meide said the crash divers took a measuring tape and measured ability of the ship. And those measurements match up with the artery's plan. "We're pretty convinced there is compelling evidence this is the Cotopaxi," Meide told First Coast News. "Mystery solved!" So what happened to the ship in 1925? Meide said agreeing to investigate, the ship was missing important structural components. Also, "unbeknownst to the chief and crew, they were sailing into the mouth of a tropical storm," he pret. quoth. So all this time, the Cotopaxi was famous for its Bermuda Triangle connection and picture show stardom when, it turns out, "it's been right off our coast Spear fishermen have been diving off of this clothes for years," Meide said. These findings will air in a new Science Channel series called Shipwreck Secrets on Feb. 9. Meide will be featured in that episode.

The leviathan was missing important structural components and "unbeknownst to the captain and throng, they were sailing into a tropical storm," Meide said. The ship set sail on Nov. 29, 1925.

(CNN) — Marine biologists at the South Carolina Aquarium were treating a rare, 475-pound leatherback sea turtle that washed up Saturday, March 7, 2015, on a nearby shingle. The episode marks the first rescue of a leatherback sea turtle in South Carolina and is believed to be only the fifth feed rescue of this species in the United States, according to the South Carolina Department of Natural Resources. The endangered turtle was found abandon on the Yawkey-South Island Preserve, a wildlife refuge near Georgetown, South Carolina. Rescuers named it Yawkey. Because the turtle is believed to be a juvenile — rescuers say it's as like as not less than 10 years old — and has not retch sexual maturity, biologists can't yet finish its sex. Rescuers found no external signs of trauma to the reptile, although it was hypoglycemic. Staffers with the aquarium's sea turtle rescue program gave it antibiotics, vitamins and some time to recover at their facilities. The treatments appear to be helping. Aquarium officials said the turtle was more energetic Tuesday than when it was first admitted. Even so, leatherback turtles historically don't do well in captivity. For that sake, aquarium staffers are practical with the pomp's Department of Natural Resources to determine the best place and time to release the turtle back into the ogin — most likely within the next few days. Leatherbacks are the largest turtles on Earth and can grow up to 2,000 pounds. They are found throughout the globe's oceans and have been spotty as far northward as Norway and as far south as South America.

Even so, leatherback turtles historically don't do well in captivity. For that reason, aquarium staffers are working with the state's Department of Natural Resources to determine the best office and time to discharge the turtle back into the ocean — most likely within the next few days.


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