Trump's first failure of 2021 is already here, in plain sight

Trump's first failure of 2021 is already here, in plain sight

In possession after state, the results have been chaotic. In one Kentucky community, doses were intimately worthless when one nursing home ordered more than it needed. (Pharmacists saved the shots from the waste bin by offering them to favorable customers on the spot.) In Palo Alto, Calif., faulty algorithms initially excluded frontline hospital residents from getting vaccinated. In New York and Boston, curer who are at low risk have been caught cutting ahead of those at high risk. In Wisconsin, some 500 drug were deliberately wasted by a hospital employé. In Florida, seniors are waiting in line overnight in some cases.

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If this election is about the "soul" of America, then even voting Donald Trump out of office is not enough. The præses's sustained support demonstrates that the looking-glass we hold up to America's life should force us to reflect on the beliefs, the systems, and the political practices that elected him. Biden's support is enough evidence to say that America isn't Trump, but Trump still represents a admirable part of America's soul. Confronting that part means confronting the nation's racism, xenophobia, and classism. If, someday, we prove successful in battling those demons, then Trump was the glass America needful.

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By October, exact a month before the election, polls evince that a majority of Americans were "not too confident" that the choice would be generalship fairly. In three separate polls, the number was higher with members of Trump's partial.

The Domestic Terrorism Prevention Act of 2019, a Senate bill introduced by Sen. Dick Durbin (D-IL), comprehend a furnish that requires the FBI to assess the threat posed by white supremacist and neo-Nazi infiltration of law enforcement and the soldiery. This assessment should be informed by data collected from FBI investigations and surveys of federal, possession, and local equity constraint agencies, and from data collected for the law enforcement use of force database.

The Avenue Win or lose, Trump was the old America needful Andre M. Perry Wednesday, November 4, 2020 The Avenue FacebookTwitterLinkedInPrintSMSEmailMoreReddit Andre M. Perry Fellow - Metropolitan Policy Program Twitter @andreperryedu A Time after Election Day 2020, the presidential issue between Donald Trump and Joe Biden is still too close to call. As states continue to count ballots, the potentially for rehearse and litigation to affect the final outcome endure. Viable routes to walk-over remain for both candidates, even in the midst of several colossal failures that should have resulted in a trouncing of the incumbent Trump. At uncertain step during the electioneer, both Trump and Biden referred to this election as a fight for the "soul" of America. If that is the case, Trump's ameliorate-than-expected performance should hold a speculum up for Americans to see what that heart truly looks like. Related Books Know Your Price By Andre M. Perry 2020 After downplaying the COVID-19 pandemic that has taken more than 200,000 American lives, Trump still has rock solid support, even after contracting the illness himself. In the past four years, he has openly fawned vicious dictators such as Russian heady Vladimir Putin, Turkish president Recep Tayyip Erdoğan, and North Korean supreme chief Kim Jong-un. He inappropriately deployed the military on American citizens during a moment of convival unquietness. He has failed to denounce white supremacy, separated immigrant parents from their children, consistently deployed racist rhetoric, and banned residents of seven Muslim-majority countries from entrant the U.S. None of this seems to have eroded his base, even voters of color—exit polls show that Trump maintain from Black and Latino or Hispanic voters is up from 2016. Meanwhile, California's raging wildfires highlight Trump's decision to retire the United States from the Paris climate agreement. His lack of transparency and demonization of the press can only be considered acceptable under an authoritarian system. He regularly flaunts undemocratic values, and his narcissism seemingly knows no bounds. He has converted press briefings into a omnibus for his personal political reality show. In malevolence all of this, during his term in discharge, Trump still retained the back of roughly hemisphere of the electorate. Trump isn't the cause; he is a cogitation of past policymakers, values, and practices. To be clear, most Americans recognize the danger Trump posturize to democracy—he lost the popular vote in 2016, and all signs detail to the same outcome for 2020. More voters than not hear the trouble and suffering his quest to make America "great" has caused for women, immigrants, people of color, the poor, and the working class. Still, the outsized support Trump has extended to receive exposes America's "soul" for what it is. Trump's racist rhetoric isn't novel or unique. He isn't the only billionaire that quibble millions in taxes. And, tragically, immigrants of paint have always been treated worse than their white, Western European counterparts. With that in mind, historians won't relation the day Trump took office when writing throughout the erosion of democratic traditions. Trump isn't the cause; he is a reflection of past policymakers, values, and practices. Trump's now-predictable behavior will persist. In fill with his values, he falsely stated gammon in the centric of the adversity, essentially inviting violence, wise and legal turmoil, and a horrible expectation that he dwelling't leave office peacefully if he loses now or even after a potential second term. These undemocratic pronouncements should not surprise us, nor should the apparently undiminished uphold for those pronouncements—after all, this is the man who said, at a 2016 rally, "I could stand in the middle of 5th Avenue and shoot somebody and I wouldn't lose voters." America has proved him right. If this election is about the "soul" of America, then even voting Donald Trump out of office is not enough. Biden's potential epinician, meanwhile, will be made possibility by America's cities, populated by companions of pigment. Trump has referred to these Black and brown neighborhoods as trust harassing by crime and rodents. They are not; these communities are places that erect wholeness, hope, hard work, and determination—values that the country must build upon. If this election is about the "soul" of America, then even voting Donald Trump out of office is not enough. The president's continued protect show that the mirror we hold up to America's soul should force us to reflect on the beliefs, the systems, and the political practices that elected him. Biden's support is enough evidence to say that America isn't Trump, but Trump still represents a good part of America's soul. Confronting that part means confronting the nation's racism, xenophobia, and classism. If, someday, we prove successful in battling those demons, then Trump was the glass America needed. Related Content The Avenue Protesting is as considerable as voting Andre M. Perry and Carl Romer Friday, August 28, 2020 The Avenue Trump's violent debate performance is a reflection of his racially violent policies Andre M. Perry Wednesday, September 30, 2020 Essay To protect Black women and save America from itself, predestinate Black women Andre M. Perry Monday, July 27, 2020 Related Topics Campaigns & Elections Social Issues U.S. Economy U.S. Politics & Government More Coronavirus (COVID-19) Economics How misinformation is distorting COVID policies and behaviors Jonathan Rothwell and Sonal Desai Tuesday, December 22, 2020 U.S. Economy Using automatic stabilization programs to fight recessions and hurry recoveries William A. Galston Wednesday, December 16, 2020 Coronavirus (COVID-19) Economics More economic indemnification and stimulus: Why and how William G. Gale and Grace Enda Wednesday, December 16, 2020 The Brookings Institution Facebook Find us on Facebook Twitter Find us on Twitter YouTube Find us on YouTube Podcast Listen to our Podcast Browse Newsletters Browse Newsletters RSS Subscribe to our RSS Languages Español 中文 عربي About Us Research Programs Find an Expert Careers Contact Terms and Conditions Brookings Privacy Policy Copyright 2021 The Brookings Institution

While it is important to protect the integrity of FBI terrorism investigations and the safeness of law enforcement personnel, Congress has also tasked the FBI with protecting the civil suitable of American communities often targeted with discriminatory suspend, searches, arrests, and brutality at the hands of police conduct. The issue in these cases isn't ideology but law enforcement connections to subjects of active terrorism investigations. It is disagreeable that the FBI would be similarly hesitant to act if it received information that U.S. law compulsion officials were briskly linked to terrorist groups like al-Qaeda or ISIS, or to criminal organizations like street gangs or the Mafia. Yet many of the white supremacist groups investigated by the FBI have longer and more violent histories than these other organizations. The federal response to known connections of law compulsion officers to white supremacist and far-perpendicular militant groups has been strikingly insufficient.

After downplaying the COVID-19 pandemic that has taken more than 200,000 American lives, Trump still has rock solid support, even after contracting the illness himself. In the past four years, he has openly fawned foul dictators such as Russian president Vladimir Putin, Turkish president Recep Tayyip Erdoğan, and North Korean supreme leader Kim Jong-un. He inappropriately extend the military on American citizens during a moment of social unrest. He has failed to denounce white authority, separated visitor parents from their children, consistently deployed racist oratory, and banned residents of seven Muslim-majority countries from entering the U.S. None of this seems to have eroded his base, even voters of excuse—exit parrot show that Trump protect from Black and Latino or Hispanic voters is up from 2016.

The media do not get to determine who the president is. The people do. When all lawful votes have been counted, recounts complete, and allegations of fraud addressed, we will know who the conqueror is— Josh Hawley (@HawleyMO) November 7, 2020

When asked more generally about the issue, McGarrity said he would be "suspect" of white supremacist police officers, but that their ideology was a First Amendment–protected right. The 2006 assessment addresses this concern, however, correctly summarizing Supreme Court example on the progeny: "Although the First Amendment's freedom of association provision protects an particular's right to join fortunate supremacist groups for the purposes of lawful activity, the regulation can limit the work opportunities of group members who hold tender public sector jobs, including jobs within law compulsion, when their memberships would interfere with their duties." footnote9_5pngkn6 9 FBI, Counterterrorism Division, White Supremacist Infiltration of Law Enforcement, 6. See also Pickering, 391 U.S. 563; Garcetti, 547 U.S. 410, 417.

What we are not seeing, in any way, is a wholesale rejection on the right of Trump's effort to delegitimize the election. And thus there is no reason to believe Trump will not remain his hold over much of the party, and much of its base, going earnest.

Meanwhile, California's raging wildfires highlight Trump's decision to withdraw the United States from the Paris clime concord. His offense of transparency and demonization of the compel can only be considered acceptable under an authoritarian system. He regularly wave undemocratic import, and his narcissism seemingly knows no bounds. He has converted press briefings into a stage for his movable political reality show. In vex all of this, during his term in business, Trump still retained the backing of roughly half of the electorate.

He's not a politician but a renegade. And America, or at least a consequential portion of it, was in a place where a renegade was exactly what it wanted.

The poll workers kept counting. The elections officials kept announcing full. The vast majority of Americans — hundreds of millions of them — settled home, watched and waited, trusting, however tentatively, that the process would work.

How do I hate thee, 2020? Let me count the ways. Sure, there was plenty of cartoon material, but I'd have much rather we had a boring ol' year. No such hap this turn around the insolate.

Andre M. Perry Fellow - Metropolitan Policy Program Twitter @andreperryedu A day after Election Day 2020, the presidential race between Donald Trump and Joe Biden is still too close to call. As states continue to count ballots, the potential for recounts and litigation to affect the final outcome remains. Viable course to victory remain for both candidates, even in the midst of several giant failures that should have resulted in a trouncing of the incumbent Trump. At various points during the campaign, both Trump and Biden referred to this choice as a fight for the "soul" of America. If that is the case, Trump's better-than-expected performance should occupy a exemplar up for Americans to see what that soul truly looks like. Related Books Know Your Price By Andre M. Perry 2020 After downplaying the COVID-19 pandemic that has taken more than 200,000 American alive, Trump still has rock solid support, even after contracting the sickness himself. In the past four years, he has openly fawned vicious dictators such as Russian president Vladimir Putin, Turkish president Recep Tayyip Erdoğan, and North Korean supreme alpha Kim Jong-un. He inappropriately extend the military on American citizens during a value of social unrest. He has failed to denounce white supremacy, separated colonist origin from their children, consistently extend racist rhetoric, and banned residents of seven Muslim-majority countries from entering the U.S. None of this seems to have gnawed his base, even voters of color—exit polls show that Trump support from Black and Latino or Hispanic voters is up from 2016. Meanwhile, California's raging wildfires highlight Trump's decision to withdraw the United States from the Paris dwell consonance. His blame of transparence and demonization of the press can only be considered acceptable under an authoritarian regime. He regularly flaunts undemocratic importance, and his narcissism seemingly knows no bounds. He has converted press briefings into a stage for his personal political reality show. In spite all of this, during his term in office, Trump still retained the backing of roughly half of the Kingdom. Trump isn't the cause; he is a reflection of past policymakers, values, and practices. To be clear, most Americans concede the sparingness Trump poses to democracy—he lost the epidemic doom in 2016, and all signs point to the same outcome for 2020. More voters than not understand the pain and suffering his quest to occasion America "great" has caused for women, immigrants, people of color, the poor, and the operation class. Still, the outsized support Trump has continued to receive exposes America's "soul" for what it is. Trump's racist rhetoric isn't novel or unique. He isn't the only billionaire that dodges millions in taxes. And, tragically, immigrants of color have always been parley worse than their pallid, Western European counterparts. With that in mind, historians wone't reference the day Trump took business when writing throughout the erosion of democratic traditions. Trump isn't the cause; he is a reflection of past policymakers, importance, and practices. Trump's now-predictable behavior will continue. In line with his values, he falsely declared victory in the midst of the night, essentially inviting violation, political and legal disquiet, and a horrible expectation that he won't leave office peacefully if he loses now or even after a potential second bound. These undemocratic pronouncements should not hold us, nor should the seemingly undiminished support for those pronouncements—after all, this is the man who aforesaid, at a 2016 rally, "I could stand in the middle of 5th Avenue and shoot somebody and I wouldn't lose voters." America has proved him right. If this election is touching the "sole" of America, then even voting Donald Trump out of party is not enough. Biden's potential victory, meanwhile, will be made possible by America's cities, people by community of color. Trump has referred to these Black and brown neighborhoods as places infested by murder and rodents. They are not; these communities are places that elevate integrity, hope, hard work, and determination—luminosity that the country must build upon. If this choice is about the "energy" of America, then even voting Donald Trump out of office is not enough. The president's uniform support demonstrates that the mirror we hold up to America's soul should force us to reflect on the beliefs, the systems, and the political practices that choose him. Biden's support is enough evidence to specimen that America isn't Trump, but Trump still represents a good part of America's soul. Confronting that part means confronting the nation's racism, xenophobia, and classism. If, someday, we justify successful in battling those demons, then Trump was the mirror America needed. Related Content The Avenue Protesting is as important as voting Andre M. Perry and Carl Romer Friday, August 28, 2020 The Avenue Trump's fierce debate performance is a reflection of his racially impetuous policies Andre M. Perry Wednesday, September 30, 2020 Essay To protect Black women and save America from itself, return Black women Andre M. Perry Monday, July 27, 2021

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